Sustainability

2016-17 Edition

PCC's academic sustainability committee, SPARC (Sustainable Practices for Academics and Resources Council) has identified courses in the current catalog as having a sustainability focus. 

A Focus Award in Sustainability is also offered.

Architecture Design & Drafting

ARCH 131. Sustainable Building Strategies. 4 Credits.

Focuses on creating buildings that are sited, designed, constructed, operated and maintained for the health and well-being of the occupants, while minimizing impact on the environment. Prerequisite: ID 121 Prerequisite/concurrent: ARCH 224. Audit available.

ARCH 204. Green Residential Studio. 4 Credits.

Covers advanced study of sustainable building design and systems, applied to residential buildings. Includes site analysis passive technologies, and use of sustainable building materials. Involves application of concepts applied to an actual house design in a studio format. Prerequisite: ARCH 101 or department approval for similar experience. Prerequisite/concurrent: ARCH 131 and ARCH 224, and ID 121; or instructor permission. Audit available.

ARCH 224. Active and Passive Building Systems. 4 Credits.

Covers environmental building systems for residential applications and evaluation of building performance. Prerequisite: ARCH 124. Audit available.

ARCH 280. Cooperative Education:Architectural Design and Drafting. 1-4 Credit.

Work or observe on approved job sites. Student receives as varied and complete an experience as possible under job conditions. Credits are variable and based on the number of clock hours student spends on job site. Must be coordinated with the supervisor, instructor, and cooperative education specialist. Department permission required.

Biology

BI 101. Biology. 4 Credits.

Introduces the properties of life, morphology and physiology of cells, cell chemistry, energy transformation, and the basic principles of ecology. A laboratory science course designed for non-biology majors. Prerequisites: WR 115, RD 115 and MTH 20 or equivalent placement test scores. Audit available. This course fulfills the following GE requirements: Science, Math, Computer Science/AAOT, Science, Math, Computer Science/AS, Science, Math, Computer Science/AAS, Science, Math, Computer Science/AGS, Science, Math, Computer Science/ASOT-B.

BI 103. Biology. 4 Credits.

Presents the evolutionary relationships among the kingdoms. Includes a comparison of biological systems across kingdoms. Designed as a laboratory science course for non-biology majors. Prerequisites: WR 115, RD 115 and MTH 20 or equivalent placement test scores, and BI 101. Audit available. This course fulfills the following GE requirements: Science, Math, Computer Science/AAOT, Science, Math, Computer Science/AS, Science, Math, Computer Science/AAS, Science, Math, Computer Science/AGS, Science, Math, Computer Science/ASOT-B.

BI 141. Habitats: Life of the Forest. 4 Credits.

Examines structure and function of Oregon forest ecosystems. Covers distribution and interactions of plants, animals, microorganisms, climate and basic geology. Laboratory emphasizes identification and environmental testing. Prerequisites: WR 115, RD 115 and MTH 20 or equivalent placement test scores. Audit available. This course fulfills the following GE requirements: Science, Math, Computer Science/AAOT, Science, Math, Computer Science/AS, Science, Math, Computer Science/AAS, Science, Math, Computer Science/AGS, Science, Math, Computer Science/ASOT-B.

BI 143. Habitats: Fresh Water Biology. 4 Credits.

Covers environments of freshwater streams, lakes, and marshes. Includes effects of physical and chemical factors on organisms, along with the organisms, their biological interactions and nutrient cycles. Explores ecological factors of freshwater environments and the effects of human activities on them. Prerequisites: WR 115, RD 115 and MTH 20 or equivalent placement test scores. Audit available. This course fulfills the following GE requirements: Science, Math, Computer Science/AAOT, Science, Math, Computer Science/AS, Science, Math, Computer Science/AAS, Science, Math, Computer Science/AGS, Science, Math, Computer Science/ASOT-B.

BI 145. Intro. to Fish and Wildlife Conservation and Management. 4 Credits.

Covers the basic elements of wildlife population dynamics, biodiversity, the importance of habitat, legal and social aspects of wildlife management, human impacts on wildlife, and some management techniques. Includes wildlife examples from Oregon. Prerequisites: Placement into MTH 60 and placement into WR 115. Recommended: BI 101 or equivalent. Audit available.

BI 160. Ecology/Field Biology: Coast. 2 Credits.

Field trip experience designed to introduce the relationships among plants, animals and the general geologic formation of various life zones for the Oregon Coast. Audit available.

BI 161. Ecology/Field Bio: Great Basin. 2 Credits.

Introduces the relationships among plants, animals and the general geological formations of various life zones for the Great Basin and/or Cascades geographical areas through a field trip experience. Audit available.

BI 163. Organic Gardening. 4 Credits.

Introduces the structure and function of soils including the soil food web, composting and compost tea, and the basics of biogeochemical cycling. Explores basic plant anatomy and the growing of flowers, vegetables and fruits in the Pacific Northwest. Includes discussion of organic pest control, beneficial insects, and pruning and grafting and exploration of these concepts in laboratory. An interest in plants and a basic high school biology course are recommended. Audit available. This course fulfills the following GE requirements: Science, Math, Computer Science/AAOT, Science, Math, Computer Science/AS, Science, Math, Computer Science/AAS, Science, Math, Computer Science/AGS, Science, Math, Computer Science/ASOT-B.

BI 164. Bird ID and Ecology. 4 Credits.

Introduces the biology of birds of the Pacific Northwest. Emphasizes learning bird identification in the field by sight and sounds. Covers the study of avian ecology, natural history and behavior. Introduces field techniques for identifying and studying birds. Prerequisites: WR 115, RD 115 and MTH 20 or equivalent placement test scores. Audit available. This course fulfills the following GE requirements: Science, Math, Computer Science/AAOT, Science, Math, Computer Science/AS, Science, Math, Computer Science/AAS, Science, Math, Computer Science/AGS, Science, Math, Computer Science/ASOT-B.

BI 200A. Principles of Ecology: Field Biology. 2 Credits.

Introduction to concepts of ecology. Includes lecture component covering the concepts of ecology and diversity of life and a field component surveying plants, animals, or other kingdoms, and interactions with their environment. May involve national or international travel. Prerequisite: WR 115, RD 115 and MTH 20 or equivalent placement test scores. Audit available.

BI 200B. Principles of Ecology: Field Biology. 4 Credits.

Introduces concepts of ecology. Includes lecture component covering the concepts of ecology and diversity of life and a field component surveying plants, animals, or other kingdoms, and interactions with their environment. May involve national or international travel. Prerequisites: WR 115, RD 115 and MTH 20 or equivalent placement test scores. Audit available. This course fulfills the following GE requirements: Science, Math, Computer Science/AAOT, Science, Math, Computer Science/AS, Science, Math, Computer Science/AAS, Science, Math, Computer Science/AGS.

BI 200C. Principles of Ecology: Field Biology. 6 Credits.

Introduction to concepts of ecology. Includes lecture component covering the concepts of ecology and diversity of life and a field component surveying plants, animals, or other kingdoms, and interactions with their environment. May involve national or international travel. Prerequisite: WR 115, RD 115 and MTH 20 or equivalent placement test scores. Audit available.

BI 213. Principles of Biology. 5 Credits.

Includes plant and animal anatomy and physiology, and individual, population, community and ecosystem ecology. The third course of a three-course sequence for students majoring in biology and the sciences, including pre-medical, pre-dental, chiropractic, pharmacy, and related fields. Prerequisite: BI 212 and its prerequisite requirements. Audit available. This course fulfills the following GE requirements: Science, Math, Computer Science/AAOT, Science, Math, Computer Science/AS, Science, Math, Computer Science/AAS, Science, Math, Computer Science/AGS, Science, Math, Computer Science/ASOT-B.

BI 280A. Cooperative Education: Biology. 1-10 Credit.

Offers relevant experience in the field or laboratory in an area of biology or environmental sciences. Provides an opportunity to make a cooperative education training agreement with an instructor, an employer/supervisor, and a cooperative education specialist. Prerequisite: BI 101 or BI 211, and instructor permission. Audit available.

Biology & Management of Zoo Animals

BMZA 203. Zoo Biology & Management IV - Mammals. 4 Credits.

Examines the diversity of mammalian taxa and how this relates to their captive husbandry and management needs and conservation issues. Prerequisite: BMZA 101. Department permission required. Audit available.

BMZA 240. Zoo Water Quality Management. 2 Credits.

Introduces the fundamental principles and application of water management techniques to water systems typically used in zoos. Prerequisites: MTH 65 and (CH 151 or CH 104 or higher). Department permission required. Audit available.

Building Construction Technology

BCT 108. Introduction to Building Science - Energy Efficient Housing. 3 Credits.

Introduces students to the basic principles of building science in residential construction and the dynamic relationship between construction practices, material choices, physics and building operation. Critical topics include: energy and moisture transport in buildings, understanding building enclosures, comfort, building tightness and ventilation. Audit available.

BCT 115. Introduction to Residential Greenroofing. 1 Credit.

Provides a basic understanding of local residential greenroof design and installation. Covers greenroof benefits, best practices, material selections, and appropriate plantings; includes hands-on installation. Audit available.

BCT 116. Alternative Building Design. 3 Credits.

This course introduces students to natural green building principles used in the design and construction of alternative buildings such as straw bale, cobb and rammed earth. Student team will develop designs by constructing scaled models, and will then prepare and deliver presentations that defend and promote their designs. Audit available.

BCT 206. Sustainable Construction Practices. 3 Credits.

Introduces the environmental, economical, and human consequences resulting from conventional building practices and the need for sustainable design and construction. Audit available.

Business Administration

BA 278. Eco-Innovation and Social Entrepreneurship. 4 Credits.

Introduces the social, economic and environmental pillars of sustainability, and social entrepreneurship within the business environment with a focus on global, domestic and internal business methods, practices and policies. Investigates sustainable business, social innovation and intrapreneurship evolution and trends. Includes opportunities to interact with local social entrepreneurs, analyze initiatives, and develop market-based solutions to social problems. Examines individual and corporate decision-making and best practices. Includes team projects and a community-based service learning experience. Prerequisites: WR 115, RD 115 and MTH 20 or equivalent placement test scores. Audit available.

BA 280A. Cooperative Education: Business Experience. 1-6 Credit.

Offers relevant field experience in business environments in one of the following areas: bookkeeping, marketing, management, international business, advertising, banking, purchasing, investment, finance and customer services (sales or credit services). Allows exploration of career options. Course may be repeated for credit up to 12 credits. Prerequisite: Completion of 12 BA credits and instructor permission. Required concurrent, one time only: BA 280B.

BA 280B. Cooperative Education: Business Experience - Seminar. 1 Credit.

Supplements on-the-job experience through feedback sessions, instruction in job-related areas, and linkages to the student's on-campus program. Co-requisite: BA 280A Prerequisite: Department permission required.

Chemistry

CH 100. Everyday Chemistry with Lab. 4 Credits.

Introduces chemistry related topics pertaining to everyday life. Includes topics such as renewable energy, clean air and water and global climate change using a relatively nonmathematical approach. Includes atomic/molecular structure, the periodic table, chemical bonding, intermolecular forces, chemical reactions, acids/bases and the social and environmental role of chemistry. Recommended for non-science majors to fulfill the Gen Ed science with lab requirement. Prerequisite: WR 115, RD 115 and MTH 20 or equivalent placement test scores. Audit available. This course fulfills the following GE requirements: Science, Math, Computer Science/AAOT, Science, Math, Computer Science/AS, Science, Math, Computer Science/AAS, Science, Math, Computer Science/AGS, Science, Math, Computer Science/ASOT-B.

CH 298A. Chemistry Independent Study. 1 Credit.

Provides an opportunity to work independently on an individualized area of study within chemistry under the sponsorship of chemistry faculty. Prerequisites: Previous coursework in chemistry and instructor permission, and WR 115, RD 115 and MTH 20 or equivalent placement test scores.

Civil and Mechanical Technology

CMET 211. Environmental Quality. 4 Credits.

Introduces physical, chemical and biological parameters relating to the quality of water. Presents sampling systems, data analysis techniques and computational methods, including mathematical models. Recommended: CMET 131. Prerequisites: CMET 123, CH 104, and WR 115. Prerequisite or concurrent: WR 121. Audit available.

Economics

EC 221. Globalization and International Relations. 4 Credits.

Provides an introductory survey of economic, political, social, and cultural dimensions of globalization and evaluates their impacts on international relations. Examines patterns of conflict and cooperation among countries including the influence of international institutions, NGOs, and global corporations. Introduces selected issues such as war and peace, global security, environment, elites and concentration of power, wealth and income distribution, cultural and ethnic identities and explores possible peaceful solutions to these global problems. Prerequisites: WR 115, RD 115 and MTH 20 or equivalent placement test scores. PS 221, EC 221 and SOC 221 are equivalent and only one may be taken for credit. Audit available.

EC 285. Introduction to Political Economy. 4 Credits.

Covers specific topics related to the United States economy from a systems/institutional perspective. Includes key institutions that make up the U.S. economy such as, corporations, government, the market system, labor unions, monetary and financial institutions, and others. Examines three problem areas: environmental degradation and resource depletion; social and political inequality; and economic instability. Introduces possible solutions based on institutional change and develops viable economic alternatives based on principles of environmental sustainability, equity and economic stability. Prerequisites: WR 115, RD 115, and MTH 20 or equivalent placement scores. Audit available. This course fulfills the following GE requirements: Social Sciences/AAOT, Social Sciences/AS, Social Sciences/AAS, Social Sciences/AGS, Social Sciences/ASOT-B.

Electronic Engineering Technology

EET 110. Introduction to Renewable Energy. 3 Credits.

Introduces sustainability and renewable energy (RE) sources and technologies including PV and solar thermal, geothermal, biomass, biodiesel, fuel cell, wind, hydro, ocean wave, photovoltaic, etc. Covers RE environmental issues, demand and distribution management, and green and RE career opportunities, etc. Prerequisites: WR 121; prerequisite/concurrent MTH 111; or department approval. Audit available.

Environmental Studies

ESR 140. Introduction to Sustainability. 4 Credits.

Introduces theory, principles and practices of sustainability and their applications. Includes discussions on maintaining ecological and environmental integrity, human health and well-being, and economic viability. May include off-site field trips, physical activity, and hands-on learning opportunities. Prerequisites: WR 115, RD 115 and MTH 20 or equivalent placement test scores. Audit available.

ESR 141. Introduction to Individual Sustainability. 4 Credits.

Introduces theory, principles and practices of sustainability and their applications at the individual scale. Addresses a wide range of topics at the individual level including the built world, water, and energy; transportation options; wise purchasing; sustainable agriculture and food choices; recycling and waste reduction; recreation and its effects on the environment; restoring natural environments and connections between health and the environment. May include off-site field trips, physical activity, and hands-on learning opportunities. Prerequisite: WR 115, RD 115 and MTH 20 or equivalent placement test scores. Audit available.

ESR 171. Environmental Science: Biological Perspectives. 4 Credits.

Covers environmental topics that are primarily biological in nature. Includes human population issues, matter and energy resources, ecosystems, environmental ethics, and food and land resources. The associated laboratories will illustrate these topics and may include fieldwork. Prerequisites: WR 115, RD 115 and MTH 20 or equivalent placement test scores. Audit available. This course fulfills the following GE requirements: Science, Math, Computer Science/AAOT, Science, Math, Computer Science/AS, Science, Math, Computer Science/AAS, Science, Math, Computer Science/AGS, Science, Math, Computer Science/ASOT-B.

ESR 172. Environmental Science: Chemical Perspectives. 4 Credits.

Covers environmental topics that are primarily chemical in nature. Includes air pollution, global warming, toxicology, risk assessment, water pollution, and hazardous waste. The associated laboratories will illustrate these topics and may include fieldwork. Prerequisite: WR 115, RD 115 and MTH 20 or equivalent placement test scores. Audit available. This course fulfills the following GE requirements: Science, Math, Computer Science/AAOT, Science, Math, Computer Science/AS, Science, Math, Computer Science/AAS, Science, Math, Computer Science/AGS, Science, Math, Computer Science/ASOT-B.

ESR 173. Environmental Science: Geological Perspectives. 4 Credits.

Covers environmental topics that are primarily geological in nature. Includes geology basics, soil resources, hydrogeology, nonrenewable mineral and energy resources, perpetual energy resources, and solid waste. The associated laboratories will illustrate these topics and may include fieldwork. Prerequisite: WR 115, RD 115 and MTH 20 or equivalent placement test scores. Audit available. This course fulfills the following GE requirements: Science, Math, Computer Science/AAOT, Science, Math, Computer Science/AS, Science, Math, Computer Science/AAS, Science, Math, Computer Science/AGS, Science, Math, Computer Science/ASOT-B.

ESR 201. Applied Environmental Studies: Science/Policy Consideration. 4 Credits.

Introduces environmental laws and the regulations promulgated under them. Includes examinations of the genesis of these laws (e.g. NEPAA, Clean Air and Water Acts, RCRA, Endangered Species Act) and their history of compliance and violation. Prerequisite: ESR 160. Audit available.

ESR 203. Applied Environmental Studies: Project. 4 Credits.

Uses project work involving work with an environmental agency, industry, service or research organization. Prerequisite: ESR 202. Audit available.

ESR 204. Introduction to Environmental Restoration. 4 Credits.

Develops an understanding of the techniques and practices of environmental restoration using hands-on practice in the field. Includes riparian restoration and restoration in wetlands and upland ecosystems topics. Prerequisites: WR 115, RD 115 and MTH 20 or equivalent placement test scores, and ESR 160 or BI 143. Audit available.

Geography

GEO 106. World Regional Geography. 4 Credits.

Examines the human, cultural, and environmental geographic issues that shape the world's regions. Includes information on spatial patterns of economic development, natural resource uses, international trade, population and migration, transportation, and cultural landscapes. Analyzes each region as part of the larger global community, with a specific emphasis on current issues and trends. Prerequisite: WR 115, RD 115 and MTH 20 or equivalent placement test scores. Audit available. This course fulfills the following GE requirements: Cultural Literacy, Social Sciences/AAOT, Social Sciences/AS, Social Sciences/AAS, Social Sciences/AGS, Social Sciences/ASOT-B.

GEO 107. Geography of Global Issues. 4 Credits.

Examines human, cultural, and environmental geography placed in context with current issues of social, economic, and political globalization. Includes information on global spatial patterns of agriculture; industrial, post-industrial, and sustainable development; rural-to-urban migration; religious, political and resource conflicts; and cultural landscapes. Uses regional examples to illustrate geographic concepts. Prerequisite: WR 115, RD 115 and MTH 20 or equivalent placement test scores. Audit available. This course fulfills the following GE requirements: Cultural Literacy, Social Sciences/AAOT, Social Sciences/AS, Social Sciences/AAS, Social Sciences/AGS, Social Sciences/ASOT-B.

Geology

G 184. Global Climate Change. 4 Credits.

Covers characteristics of Earth's climate system. Includes the atmosphere, ocean, biosphere, and solid Earth as well as past, present, and future climate change and future mitigation and adaptation efforts. Includes a weekly lab. Prerequisites: WR 115, RD 115 and MTH 20 or equivalent placement test scores. Audit available. This course fulfills the following GE requirements: Science, Math, Computer Science/AAOT, Science, Math, Computer Science/AS, Science, Math, Computer Science/AAS, Science, Math, Computer Science/AGS, Science, Math, Computer Science/ASOT-B.

Gerontology

GRN 267. Introduction to Professional Therapeutic Horticulture. 2 Credits.

Introductory course for students training for the horticultural therapy profession and for health and human service providers desiring to add therapeutic horticulture to the treatment milieu. Topics include: history and development of the profession; code of ethics; People- Plant Relationship research base; vocational, social wellness and therapeutic program models; overview of basic clinical skills; aspects of interdisciplinary collaboration/integration in healthcare delivery; medical terminology; volunteer program development; professional resources and horticulture skills development for therapy. Audit available.

GRN 268. Techniques & Adaptive Strategies in Therapeutic Horticulture. 2 Credits.

Prepares students to design, develop, and maintain wellness activities and therapeutic horticulture gardens and programs incorporating indoor, outdoor and seasonal adaptations, strategies, and techniques. Includes a focus on special needs populations in retirement and long term care communities, vocational and medical rehabilitation facilities, and developmental disabilities settings. Students must have completed GRN 267 or the equivalent course offered through the Legacy Therapeutic Horticulture Program. Prerequisite: GRN 267 Audit available.

Health

HE 264. Health, Food Systems, and the Environment. 3 Credits.

This course will examine how food systems influence human and environmental health. Students will explore the connections between sustainable agriculture concepts/practices, food systems, and personal and environmental health. Audit available.

HE 278. Human Health and the Environment. 3 Credits.

Examines the relationship between the environment and human health. Focuses on issues such as persistent environmental contaminants, environmental toxins, chemical exposures, climate change and accompanying disease outbreaks. Includes a strong emphasis on personal decision making. Recommend: WR 115, RD 115 and MTH 20 or equivalent placement test scores. Audit available.

Horticulture

HOR 285. Permaculture Design. 7 Credits.

Covers principles of permaculture for both urban & rural applications and sustainable human settlements. Covers landscape analysis, ecological planning & design methods, organic food production, food security, natural soil improvement, integrated animal systems, water harvesting, conservation and management, forest gardening, techniques and design strategies. Upon completion of this course students will be awarded a Permaculture Design Certificate through the Cascadia Permaculture Institute. Audit available.

Interior Design

ID 121. Sustainable Materials for Residential Interiors. 3 Credits.

Covers the study of the environmental impact of materials used in residential interior design. Includes analysis and evaluation of materials based on multiple types of criteria and information. Prerequisites: WR 115 and MTH 20 or equivalent placement test scores. Audit available.

Landscape Technology

LAT 272. Sustainable Landscaping. 3 Credits.

Discusses methods used to protect and conserve natural systems and resources within the landscape. Deals with the health of people, plants and the environment and looks at new approaches to landscaping. Recommended: WR 115. Audit available.

LAT 273. Sustainable Landscape Water Management. 3 Credits.

Covers the analysis, planning, construction and management of bioswales, greenstreets, raingardens, greenwalls, greenroofs, rainwater harvesting operations and greywater systems. Includes planning and construction of a typical water management facility. Recommended: LAT 111, LAT 236, LAT 223, LAT 272, second year status. Audit available.

Literature

ENG 230. Environmental Literature. 4 Credits.

Introduces texts that explore the relationship between people and their environments, both natural and built. Examines historical trends that have shaped thinking, understanding, and feelings about how humans and the natural world interact. Explores literary writings on issues of sustainability, environmental justice, ecological literacy, and a sense of place. Prerequisites: WR 115, RD 115 and MTH 20 or equivalent placement test scores. Audit available.

ENG 269. Wilderness Literature. 4 Credits.

Explores writings about wilderness and the natural world, giving attention to the relationship between nature and culture. Considers a variety of historical perspectives through essays, poetry, book-length nonfiction, novels, and film. Examines efforts to rethink the concept of wilderness with respect to law, gender, work, race, and the built environment (e.g., urban forests, gardens, farming) while addressing contemporary concerns for global environmental sustainability. Prerequisite: WR 115 and RD 115 or equivalent placement test scores. Audit available. This course fulfills the following GE requirements: Arts and Letters/AAOT, Arts and Letters/AS, Arts and Letters/AAS, Arts and Letters/AGS, Arts and Letters/ASOT-B.

Management/Supervisory Development

MSD 200. Organizations and Social Responsibility. 3 Credits.

Explores the changing relationships and responsibilities between organizations and their various stakeholders. Includes social and ethical issues of the community in which the company exists, employee rights and diversity, global corporate citizenship, role of government oversight of business, environmental issues, and consumer protection. Audit available.

Paralegal

PL 240. Environmental Law. 3 Credits.

Explores federal, state and regional policies involving environmental issues and cutting edge developments. Includes case law trends, building regulations, energy development, energy efficiency and climate change trends. Explores how the law can be ahead of industry and how industry can be ahead of the law. Prerequisite: PL 101. Audit available.

Philosophy

PHL 206. Introduction to Environmental Ethics. 4 Credits.

Investigates the ethical questions that pertain to human choices regarding the environment. Explores questions such as, Do non-human animals have rights? What is the environment and do we have an obligation to protect it? What is the proper ethical balance between economic and environmental concerns regarding natural resources? Does the present generation have an ethical obligation to preserve a healthy environment for future generations? Prerequisites: WR 115, RD 115 and MTH 20 or equivalent placement test scores. Audit available. This course fulfills the following GE requirements: Arts and Letters/AAOT, Arts and Letters/AS, Arts and Letters/AAS, Arts and Letters/AGS, Arts and Letters/ASOT-B.

PHL 209. Business Ethics. 4 Credits.

Reviews some historical and contemporary ethical theories and ethical issues that arise in several aspects of business, such as, management, use of computers, marketing, accounting, and doing business in an international setting. Includes the social responsibilities of corporations, the rights of workers, truth in advertising, the environmental impact of doing business, affirmative action in hiring, sexual harassment in the workplace, respect for cultural differences, and the responsibilities of the individual in the corporate setting. Prerequisites: WR 115, RD 115 and MTH 20 or equivalent placement test scores. Audit available. This course fulfills the following GE requirements: Arts and Letters/AAOT, Arts and Letters/AS, Arts and Letters/AAS, Arts and Letters/AGS, Arts and Letters/ASOT-B.

Political Science

PS 221. Globalization and International Relations. 4 Credits.

Provides an introductory survey of economic, political, social, and cultural dimensions of globalization and evaluates their impacts on international relations. Examines patterns of conflict and cooperation among countries including the influence of international institutions, NGOs, and global corporations. Introduces selected issues such as war and peace, global security, environment, elites and concentration of power, wealth and income distribution, cultural and ethnic identities and explores possible peaceful solutions to these global problems. Prerequisites: WR 115, RD 115 and MTH 20 or equivalent placement test scores. PS 221, EC 221 and SOC 221 are equivalent and only one may be taken for credit. Audit available.

PS 280A. Cooperative Education: Political Science. 1-4 Credit.

Extends knowledge of Political Science through work and/or volunteer time spent in settings that provide learning experiences. Department permission required. Audit available.

PS 297. Environmental Politics and Policy. 4 Credits.

Introduces the politics of environmental policymaking in the United States. Examines the key factors behind environmental policy conflicts, with an emphasis on themes and patterns that cut across cases. Explores topics such as interest groups, social movements, political culture, public opinion, court decisions, political leadership, media coverage and partisanship. Prerequisites: WR 115, RD 115 and MTH 20 or equivalent placement test scores. Audit available. This course fulfills the following GE requirements: Social Sciences/AAOT, Social Sciences/AS, Social Sciences/AAS, Social Sciences/AGS, Social Sciences/ASOT-B.

Sociology

SOC 204. Sociology in Everyday Life. 4 Credits.

Introduces the sociological perspective and the scientific study of human social behavior. Focuses on the core concepts, theories, and research on human interactions within social groups and how people are shaped by their social locations (status, roles, race, class, sex, age, etc.) within society's structures, stratification systems, and institutions, and by cultural processes such as socialization and group dynamics. Prerequisite: RD 115 or equivalent placement test scores. Audit available. This course fulfills the following GE requirements: Cultural Literacy, Social Sciences/AAOT, Social Sciences/AS, Social Sciences/AAS, Social Sciences/AGS, Social Sciences/ASOT-B.

SOC 205. Social Change in Societies. 4 Credits.

Explores how societies change by utilizing sociological perspectives to compare and contrast the impacts of changes on individuals and our social institutions (such as the family, economy, politics, education, and religion). Prerequisites: WR 115, RD 115 and MTH 20 or equivalent placement test scores. Audit available. This course fulfills the following GE requirements: Social Sciences/AAOT, Social Sciences/AS, Social Sciences/AAS, Social Sciences/AGS, Social Sciences/ASOT-B.

SOC 228. Introduction to Environmental Sociology. 4 Credits.

Examines the relationship between society and the environment, with a focus on how industrialization and our increasing demand for natural resources has significantly impacted the planet's ability to meet the needs of humanity and other species. Explores the structural and cultural causes and consequences of such topics as production, consumption, population, development, pollution, and environmental justice and how to respond to these issues through policies and actions. Prerequisites: WR 115, RD 115 and MTH 20 or equivalent placement test scores. Audit available. This course fulfills the following GE requirements: Cultural Literacy, Social Sciences/AAOT, Social Sciences/AS, Social Sciences/AAS, Social Sciences/AGS, Social Sciences/ASOT-B.

SOC 280A. Cooperative Education: Sociology. 1-3 Credit.

Expands knowledge of sociology through work and/or volunteer experiences which provide opportunities for application of sociological learning objectives and practical skill development. Prerequisite: Instructor permission required.