Philosophy

2014-15 Edition

Cascade Campus
Liberal Arts and Mathematics Division
Terrell Hall (TH), Room 220
971-722-5251

Rock Creek Campus
Building 3, Room 201
971-722-7235

Sylvania Campus
Social Science Building (SS), Room 217
971-722-4289

Description

Philosophers ask and attempt to answer fundamental questions about ourselves and the world. What is real? What can be known? How should we live our lives? What is the nature of human nature? What distinguishes logic from illogic? Philosophy courses will look at the answers given to such questions by major historical figures and will help the student to learn how to think critically about issues of the sort raised by these questions. Philosophy courses need not be taken in sequence. All philosophy courses are transferable to Portland State University, Oregon State University and the University of Oregon.

Courses

PHL 185. Computer Ethics. 3 Credits.

Addresses the ethical and social issues that arise around the use of computer technology. Explores actual and potential applications of computer technology and our ethical Responsibilities when deciding how to best use it. Prerequisites: WR 115, RD 115 and MTH 20 or equivalent placement test scores. Audit available.

PHL 191. Analysis & Evaluation of Argument. 4 Credits.

Analyzing arguments, recognizing arguments when they occur, discerning simple logical patterns of argument, extracting arguments from the contexts in which they occur, restating them in clear and concise terms and clearing away needless language in formulating arguments. Common reasoning errors involving fallacies are identified and presented with logical alternatives. Prerequisites: WR 115, RD 115 and MTH 20 or equivalent placement test scores. Audit available. This course fulfills the following GE requirements: Arts and Letters/AAOT, Arts and Letters/AS, Arts and Letters/AAS, Arts and Letters/AGS, Arts and Letters/ASOT-B.

PHL 195. Critical Thinking: Science and the Occult. 4 Credits.

Introduces scientific method, assessment criteria for scientific observations and explanations and the difference between genuine and bogus science. Prerequisite: WR 115, RD 115 and MTH 20 or equivalent placement test scores. Audit available. This course fulfills the following GE requirements: Arts and Letters/AAOT, Arts and Letters/AS, Arts and Letters/AAS, Arts and Letters/AGS, Arts and Letters/ASOT-B.

PHL 197. Manufacturing Reality: Critical Thinking and the Media. 4 Credits.

Addresses the growing impact of electronic media on our perceptions of truth and reality. Emphasizes skills to critically deconstruct and analyze the embedded values, messages, and techniques of electronic media as a basis for empowering students to formulate meaningful responses. Prerequisites: WR 115, RD 115 and MTH 20 or equivalent placement test scores. Audit available. This course fulfills the following GE requirements: Arts and Letters/AAOT, Arts and Letters/AS, Arts and Letters/AAS, Arts and Letters/AGS, Arts and Letters/ASOT-B.

PHL 201. Being and Knowing. 4 Credits.

Introduces metaphysics and the theory of knowledge via the works of important figures in the history of philosophy. Prerequisites: WR 115, RD 115 and MTH 20 or equivalent placement test scores. Audit available. This course fulfills the following GE requirements: Arts and Letters/AAOT, Arts and Letters/AS, Arts and Letters/AAS, Arts and Letters/AGS, Arts and Letters/ASOT-B.

PHL 201H. Being and Knowing: Honors. 4 Credits.

Honors version of PHL 201. Introduces metaphysics and the theory of knowledge via the works of important figures in the history of philosophy. Prerequisites: WR 115, RD 115 and MTH 20 or equivalent placement test scores, and MTH3.25 GPA. Audit available. This course fulfills the following GE requirements: Arts and Letters/AAOT, Arts and Letters/AS, Arts and Letters/AAS, Arts and Letters/AGS, Arts and Letters/ASOT-B.

PHL 202. Ethics. 4 Credits.

Studies attempts by philosophers to account for the difference between right and wrong, for the notion of moral obligation and to answer the question: How should we lead our lives. Prerequisites: WR 115, RD 115 and MTH 20 or equivalent placement test scores. Audit available. This course fulfills the following GE requirements: Arts and Letters/AAOT, Arts and Letters/AS, Arts and Letters/AAS, Arts and Letters/AGS, Arts and Letters/ASOT-B.

PHL 202H. Ethics: Honors. 4 Credits.

Honors version of PHL 202. Studies attempts by philosophers to account for the difference between right and wrong, for the notion of moral obligation and to answer the question: How should we lead our lives? Prerequisites: WR 115, RD 115 and MTH 20 or equivalent placement test scores, and MTH3.25 GPA. Audit available. This course fulfills the following GE requirements: Arts and Letters/AAOT, Arts and Letters/AS, Arts and Letters/AAS, Arts and Letters/AGS, Arts and Letters/ASOT-B.

PHL 204. Philosophy of Religion. 4 Credits.

Examines the existence and attributes of God, faith, reason and mysticism, religion and science, religion and morality, religious language and life after death from the perspective of the philosopher. Prerequisites: WR 115, RD 115 and MTH 20 or equivalent placement test scores. Audit available. This course fulfills the following GE requirements: Arts and Letters/AAOT, Arts and Letters/AS, Arts and Letters/AAS, Arts and Letters/AGS, Arts and Letters/ASOT-B.

PHL 205. Contemporary Moral Problems: Biomedical Ethics. 4 Credits.

Designed primarily for nursing and other health care students. Focuses on applying ethical concepts to the situations and dilemmas nurses and other health care workers confront in their professional roles. Prerequisites: WR 115, RD 115 and MTH 20 or equivalent placement test scores. Audit available. This course fulfills the following GE requirements: Arts and Letters/AAOT, Arts and Letters/AS, Arts and Letters/AAS, Arts and Letters/AGS, Arts and Letters/ASOT-B.

PHL 206. Introduction to Environmental Ethics. 4 Credits.

Investigates the ethical questions that pertain to human choices regarding the environment. Some of the questions addressed include: Do non-human animals have rights? What is the environment and do we have an obligation to protect it? What is the proper ethical balance between economic and environmental concerns regarding natural resources? Does the present generation have an ethical obligation to preserve a healthy environment for future generations? Prerequisites: WR 115, RD 115 and MTH 20 or equivalent placement test scores. Audit available. This course fulfills the following GE requirements: Arts and Letters/AAOT, Arts and Letters/AS, Arts and Letters/AAS, Arts and Letters/AGS, Arts and Letters/ASOT-B.

PHL 207. Ethical Issues in Aging. 4 Credits.

Applies various ethical principles and critical frameworks to ethical issues and dilemmas that arise in working with older people in a variety of settings. Utilizes an interdisciplinary approach to investigating ethical issues and engaging in well-reasoned ethical discussions regarding matters of aging in order to become more proficient in ethical decision making. Prerequisites: WR 115, RD 115 and MTH 20 or equivalent placement test scores. Audit available. This course fulfills the following GE requirements: Arts and Letters/AAOT, Arts and Letters/AS, Arts and Letters/AAS, Arts and Letters/AGS, Arts and Letters/ASOT-B.

PHL 208. Political Philosophy. 4 Credits.

Introduction to and analysis of political theories and concepts through study of the works of major figures in the history of political philosophy from Plato to the present. Prerequisites: WR 115, RD 115 and MTH 20 or equivalent placement test scores. Audit available. This course fulfills the following GE requirements: Arts and Letters/AAOT, Arts and Letters/AS, Arts and Letters/AAS, Arts and Letters/AGS, Arts and Letters/ASOT-B.

PHL 209. Business Ethics. 4 Credits.

Designed primarily for students of business and related fields. Reviews some historical and contemporary ethical theories and ethical issues that arise in several aspects of business, such as, management, use of computers, marketing, accounting, and doing business in an international setting. Includes the social responsibilities of corporations, the rights of workers, truth in advertising, the environmental impact of doing business, affirmative action in hiring, sexual harassment in the workplace, respect for cultural differences, and the responsibilities of the individual in the corporate setting. Prerequisites: WR 115, RD 115 and MTH 20 or equivalent placement test scores. Audit available. This course fulfills the following GE requirements: Arts and Letters/AAOT, Arts and Letters/AS, Arts and Letters/AAS, Arts and Letters/AGS, Arts and Letters/ASOT-B.

PHL 210. Introduction to Asian Philosophy. 4 Credits.

Introduces the non-dualistic philosophies of India, China, Japan, and South East Asia, which offer a complementary approach to Western traditions in logic, ethics, epistemology, and metaphysics. Prerequisites: WR 115, RD 115 and MTH 20 or equivalent placement test scores. Audit available. This course fulfills the following GE requirements: Cultural Literacy, Arts and Letters/AAOT, Arts and Letters/AS, Arts and Letters/AAS, Arts and Letters/AGS, Arts and Letters/ASOT-B.

PHL 211. Existentialism. 4 Credits.

This course will investigate existential philosophy from the 19th Century to the present. Students will become familiar with the different branches of existentialist thought and the influence existentialism had on philosophy, literature, and culture in the 19th and 20th Centuries. Philosophers that will be studied include, but are not limited to, some of the following: Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Heidegger, Camus and Sartre. Prerequisite: Placement into WR 121 and placement into RD 90 Audit available. This course fulfills the following GE requirements: Arts and Letters/AAOT, Arts and Letters/AS, Arts and Letters/AAS, Arts and Letters/AGS, Arts and Letters/ASOT-B.

PHL 212. Introduction to Philosophy of Mind. 4 Credits.

Introduces historical and contemporary thought in the philosophy of mind, considering traditional philosophical questions about the nature of the human person in the light of recent research in the cognitive sciences. Includes reading pertinent philosophical and related texts, and may involve museum and research facility field trips, the informal replication of experiments demonstrating interesting aspects of conscious experience, and the utilization of pertinent online, film, and other contemporary media accounts. Features texts from the literature of philosophy of mind, such as discussions of brains in vats, zombies, the plight of color-blind neuroscientists, and what it's like to be a bat. Prerequisite: WR 115, RD 115 and MTH 20 or equivalent placement test scores. Audit available. This course fulfills the following GE requirements: Arts and Letters/AAOT, Arts and Letters/AS, Arts and Letters/AAS, Arts and Letters/AGS, Arts and Letters/ASOT-B.

PHL 221. Symbolic Logic. 4 Credits.

Utilizes the constructs and techniques of symbolic logic to illustrate the basis for assessing validity in arguments. Prerequisites: WR 115, RD 115, and MTH 20 or equivalent placement scores. Audit available. This course fulfills the following GE requirements: Arts and Letters/AAOT, Arts and Letters/AS, Arts and Letters/AAS, Arts and Letters/AGS, Arts and Letters/ASOT-B.

PHL 222. The Philosophy of Art and Beauty. 4 Credits.

Introductory course exploring individual and cultural assumptions about the nature of art and aesthetic expression. Applies a philosophical approach to the study of art forms from many world cultures. In seminar/workshop format, the class involves the study of a variety of media and genres, with possible field trips to museums, galleries gardens, and performing arts events. Prerequisites: WR 115, RD 115 and MTH 20 or equivalent placement test scores. Audit available. This course fulfills the following GE requirements: Arts and Letters/AAOT, Arts and Letters/AS, Arts and Letters/AAS, Arts and Letters/AGS, Arts and Letters/ASOT-B.

PHL 298. Independent Study: Philosophy. 4 Credits.

Advanced, individualized study in areas of philosophy not considered in other courses to meet special interests or program requirements. Complete a term project and readings approved by the instructor. Recommended: prior study in philosophy and instructor permission. Audit available.