2014-15 Edition

Sylvania Campus
Health Technology Building (HT), Room 120
971-722-4466

Health Admissions
Health Technology Building (HT), Room 205
971-722-4795

www.pcc.edu/nursing

Career and Program Description

Portland Community College is a member of the Oregon Consor­tium for Nursing Education (OCNE). This statewide consortium is composed of eight Community College Nursing Programs and Oregon Health Sciences University (OHSU) School of Nursing who have jointly developed the competency-based curriculum of­fered by all OCNE schools. The core competencies address the need for nurses skilled in clinical judgment and critical thinking; evidence-based practice; relationship-centered care; interdisci­plinary collaboration; assisting individuals and families in self-care practices for promotion of health and management of chronic and acute illness; end-of-life care; and teaching, delegation, leader­ship and supervision of caregivers. Acceptance into the PCC program allows for non-competitive admission to OHSU School of Nursing.

The OCNE curriculum is designed as a four-year course of study. The first year is devoted to pre-admissions requisites and/or pre-program courses (45 credits) required before starting the nursing program. The second and third year of study is comprised of six terms, allowing students to complete the Associate of Applied Sci­ence degree (AAS) and be eligible to take the NLCEX-RN licens­ing exam. Licensure is granted through the Oregon State Board of Nursing. After licensure, students can continue on in OHSU RN-BS nursing major program.

Applications are accepted once per year in the winter for fall entry. PCC’s nursing program is competitive and applications are evalu­ated on a point system. Minimum eligibility requirements must be met in order to apply. Contact the Health Admission Office for in­formation and admission instructions.

Legal Limitations for RN Licensure

Applicants should be aware that the following questions are asked on the registered nurse licensure exam application by the Oregon State Board of Nursing:

  1. Do you have a physical, mental or emotional condition which in any way impairs your ability to practice nursing with reasonable skill and safety?
  2. Have you ever been arrested, charged with, entered a plea of guilty, nolo contendere, convicted of or been sentenced for any criminal offense, including driving under the influence, in any state?

Individuals who may have a past history of chemical abuse, felo­nies, or believe that past history circumstances may interfere with their ability to sit for the licensure examination should contact the OSBN at 971-673-0685 for recommendations prior to applying to the PCC Nursing Program. Applicants may also confer with the program director regarding concerns with any of these questions.

PCC Nursing Program Accreditation

Oregon State Board of Nursing
17938 SW Upper Boones Ferry Rd
Portland OR 97224
971-673-0685

Accreditation Commission for Education in Nursing, Inc. (ACEN)

3343 Peachtree Rd Suite 850
Atlanta, Georgia 30326
Phone (404) 975-5000

Degrees and Certificates Offered

Associate of Applied Science Degree

Nursing

Prerequisites and Requirements

Prior to admission to the nursing program all prerequisite courses must be completed with a grade C or higher. Pass/No Pass courses are not accepted. Note: Prerequisite courses and credits cannot apply toward the Nursing Degree Course of Study. Once admitted into the Nursing Program, the prerequisite courses applicants use to meet the admission requirements will be included in the overall evaluation of the degree plan.

Prerequisites Courses

BI 231Human Anatomy & Physiology I 14
BI 232Human Anatomy & Physiology II 14
BI 233Human Anatomy & Physiology III 14
FN 225Nutrition 14
MTH 95Intermediate Algebra ((or higher)) 14
PSY 215Human Development 14
WR 121English Composition4
WR 122English Composition4
Nursing Program Electives **13
Minimum required prerequisite credits completed prior to application deadline 230
Minimum required prerequisite credits completed prior to enrolling in any nursing courses 345
**

Must contain at least 6 credits of Social Science.

1

 These courses must be completed within seven years prior to application.

2

Must be completed by the end of fall term prior to applying for the nursing program. BI 231 and MTH 95 or higher or successful completion of MTH competency exam must be a part of the 30 credits completed by application deadline for application to be complete.

3

Before enrolling in nursing courses, students must complete all 45 credits of prerequisite courses by the end of spring term of the year they will enter the program and must be accepted into the nursing program.

Student Disability Information

Nursing is a physically and mentally challenging occupation. Edu­cation related to this field is designed to prepare nurses for these challenges. Nursing students must be able to meet all estab­lished essential academic and clinical requirements to success­fully complete the program. Persons with questions concerning qualifications are encouraged to contact the Admissions Office for individual consultation prior to formal application.

Applicants with disabilities are encouraged to contact Disability Services (DS) 971-722-4341. To be eligible for a reasonable ac­commodation, applicants must provide clear documentation of their disability. DS is responsible for determining if reasonable ac­commodations can be identified and ensuring that accommoda­tions are provided for PCC students. DS services are confidential and are separate from the nursing and college application pro­cesses. Early contact with DS will ensure that accommodations can be made available when students begin the program.

Nursing AAS Degree

Minimum 90 credits. Additionally, students must complete the 45 prerequisite credits prior to entry in program. Students must also meet Associate Degree Comprehensive Requirements and Associate of Applied Science Requirements. Students must complete a total of sixteen credits of General Education. Some courses specified within the program may be used as General Education. In addition to required courses in the program of study, students must satisfy MTH 65 competency. Students should consult with program advisors for course planning.

Nursing Degree Credit Summary

NRS60
BI5
Nursing Program Electives14
General Education11
Total Credits90

Course of Study

The coursework listed below is required. The following is an example of a term-by-term breakdown.

First TermCredits
NRS 110Foundations of Nursing- Health Promotion9
BI 2344*Microbiology5
Second Term
NRS 111Foundations of Nursing in Chronic Illness I6
NRS 230Clinical Pharmacology I3
NRS 232Pathophysiological Processes I3
General Education55
Third Term
NRS 112Foundations of Nursing in Acute Care I6
NRS 231Clinical Pharmacology II3
NRS 233Pathophysiological Processes II3
Nursing Program Electives55
Fourth Term
NRS 221Chronic II9
General Education56
Fifth Term
NRS 222Acute Care II9
Nursing Program Electives55
Sixth Term
NRS 224Integrative Practicum I9
Nursing Program Electives54
 Total Credits: 90
*

Could be used as General Education

4

Must be completed by the end of the first term of the nursing program and cannot be older than seven years from the time of admission.

5

Courses and credits used towards the Prerequisites cannot apply towards the Nursing Degree Course of Study.

Nursing Program Electives

Any course from the General Education/Discipline Studies List.

Note: Students who plan to continue through to OHSU must be aware that to earn the bachelor’s degree they must have two years of the same high school-level language, or two terms of college-level language or pass a language proficiency examination. College-level foreign language (including American Sign Language) credits count toward degree requirements. A minimum of 9 credits of humanities is required for the OHSU degree. Students planning to earn a bachelor’s degree are encouraged to complete MTH 243 soon after the prerequisite math course.

Courses

NRS 110. Foundations of Nursing- Health Promotion. 9 Credits.

This course introduces the learner to the framework of the OCNE curriculum. The emphasis on health promotion across the life span includes learning about self-health as well as client health practices. To support self and client health practices, students learn to access research evidence about healthy lifestyle patterns and risk factors for disease/illness, apply growth and development theory, interview clients in a culturally sensitive manner, work as members of a multidisciplinary team giving and receiving feedback about performance, and use reflective thinking about their practice as nursing students. Populations studied in the course include children, adults, older adults and the family experiencing a normal pregnancy. Includes classroom and clinical learning experiences. The clinical portion of the course includes practice with therapeutic communication skills and selected core nursing skills identified in the OCNE Core Nursing Skills document. Prerequisite: Admission to the Nursing Program.

NRS 111. Foundations of Nursing in Chronic Illness I. 6 Credits.

This course introduces assessment and common interventions (including technical procedures) for clients with chronic illnesses common across the life span in major ethnic groups. The client's and family's "lived experience" of the condition is explored. Clinical practice guidelines and research evidence are used to guide clinical judgments in care of individuals with chronic conditions. Multidisciplinary team roles and responsibilities are explored in the context of delivering safe, high quality health care to individuals with chronic conditions (includes practical and legal aspects of delegation). Cultural, ethical, legal and health care delivery issues are explored through case scenarios and clinical practice. Case exemplars include children with asthma, adolescents with a mood disorder, adults with type 2 diabetes, and older adults with dementia. The course includes class room and clinical learning experiences. Prerequisite: NRS 110. Corequisite: NRS 230 and NRS 232.

NRS 112. Foundations of Nursing in Acute Care I. 6 Credits.

This course introduces the learner to assessment and common interventions (including relevant technical procedures) for care of clients across the life span who require acute care, including normal childbirth. Disease/illness trajectories and their translation into clinical practice guidelines and/or standard procedures are considered in relation to their impact on providing culturally sensitive, client-centered care. Includes classroom and clinical learning experiences. Prerequisite: NRS 111. Corequisite: NRS 231 and NRS 233.

NRS 221. Chronic II. 9 Credits.

This course builds on foundations of nursing in Chronic Illness I. Chronic Illness II expands the student's knowledge related to family care giving, symptom management and end of life concepts. These concepts are a major focus and basis for nursing interventions with patients and families. Ethical issues related to advocacy, self determination, and autonomy are explored. Complex skills associated with the assessment and management of concurrent illnesses and conditions are developed within the context of client and family preferences and needs. Skills related to enhancing communication and collaboration as a member of an interdisciplinary team are further explored. Exemplars include patients with chronic mental illness and addictions as well as other chronic conditions and disabilities affecting functional status and family relationships. The course includes classroom and clinical learning experiences. Prerequisite: Completion of first year Nursing courses.

NRS 222. Acute Care II. 9 Credits.

This course builds on Nursing in Acute Care I, focusing on more complex and/or unstable patient care conditions, some of which may result in death. These patient care conditions require strong noticing and rapid decision making skills. Evidence base is used to support appropriate focused assessments, and effective, efficient nursing interventions. Life span and developmental factors, cultural variables, and legal aspects of care frame the ethical decision-making employed in patient choices for treatment or palliative care with the acute care setting. Case scenarios incorporate prioritizing care needs, delegation and supervision, and family and patient teaching for either discharge planning or end-of-life care. Exemplars include acute conditions affecting multiple body systems. Includes classroom and clinical learning experiences. Prerequisite: NRS 221.

NRS 224. Integrative Practicum I. 9 Credits.

This course is designed to formalize the clinical judgments, knowledge and skills necessary in safe, registered nurse practice. Faculty/Clinical Teaching Association/Student Triad Model provides a context that allows the student to experience the nursing work world in a selected setting, balancing demands of job and lifelong learner. Analysis and reflection throughout the clinical experience provide the student with evaluate criteria against which they can judge their own performance and develop a practice framework. Includes seminar, self-directed study and clinical experience. Prerequisite: NRS 222.

NRS 230. Clinical Pharmacology I. 3 Credits.

This course introduces the theoretical background that enables students to provide safe and effective care related to drugs and natural products to persons throughout the lifespan. It includes the foundational concepts of principles of pharmacology, nonopioid analgesics, and antibiotics, as well as additional classes of drugs. Students will learn to make selected clinical decisions in the context of nursing regarding using current, reliable sources of information, understanding of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, developmental physiologic considerations, monitoring and evaluating the effectiveness of drug therapy, teaching persons from diverse populations regarding safe and effective use of drugs and natural products, intervening to increase therapeutic benefits and reduce potential negative effects, and communicating appropriately with other health professionals regarding drug therapy. Drugs are studied by therapeutic or pharmacological class using an organized framework. Prerequisite: NRS 110. Co-requisite: NRS 111 and NRS 232.

NRS 231. Clinical Pharmacology II. 3 Credits.

This sequel to Clinical Pharmacology I continues to provide the theoretical background that enables students to provide safe and effective nursing care related to drugs and natural products to persons throughout the lifespan. Students will learn to make selected clinical decisions in the context of nursing regarding using current, reliable sources of information, monitoring and evaluating the effectiveness of drug therapy, teaching persons from diverse populations regarding safe and effective use of drugs and natural products, intervening to increase therapeutic benefits and reduce potential negative effects, and communicating appropriately with other health professionals regarding drug therapy. The course addresses additional classes of drugs and related natural products not contained in Clinical Pharmacology I. Prerequisites: NRS 111, NRS 230 and NRS 232. Corequisites: NRS 112 and NRS 233.

NRS 232. Pathophysiological Processes I. 3 Credits.

This course introduces pathophysiological processes that contribute to many different disease states across the lifespan and human responses to those processes. It includes the foundational concepts of cellular adaption, injury, and death; inflammation and tissue healing; fluid and electrolyte imbalances; and physiologic response to stressors and pain, as well as additional pathophysiological processes. Students will learn to make selective clinical decisions in the context of nursing regarding using current, reliable sources of pathophysiology information, selecting and interpreting focused nursing assessments based on knowledge of pathophysiological processes, teaching persons from diverse populations regarding pathophysiological processes, and communicating with other health professionals regarding pathophysiological processes. Prerequisite: NRS 110. Corequisite: NRS 111 and NRS 230.

NRS 233. Pathophysiological Processes II. 3 Credits.

This sequel to Pathophysiological Processes I continues to explore pathophysiological processes that contribute to disease states across the lifespan and human responses to those processes. Students will learn to make selected clinical decisions in the context of nursing regarding using current, reliable sources of pathophysiology information, selecting and interpreting focused nursing assessments based on knowledge of pathophysiological processes, teaching persons from diverse populations regarding pathophysiological processes, and communicating with other health professionals regarding pathophysiological processes. The course addresses additional pathophysiological processes not contained in Pathophysiological Processes I. Prerequisite: NRS 111, NRS 230 and NRS 232. Co-requisite: NRS 112 and NRS 231.