2014-15 Edition

Cascade Campus
Terrell Hall (TH), Room 220
971-722-5251

Rock Creek Campus
Building 3, Room 201
971-722-7327

Southeast Campus
Mt. Scott Hall (MSH), Room 103
971-722-6147

Sylvania Campus
Social Science Building (SS), Room 217
971-722-4289

www.pcc.edu/programs/geography/

Description

Geography is more than just knowing the names of countries, cities, rivers, mountains, and other features of the Earth. It is the study of the spatial distribution and interrelationships of the Earth, its people and physical environment. Geographers analyze the relationship between humans and the environment; examine patterns and processes of place; and take a broad perspective to look at current topics such as climate change, global economics, urban diversity and development, immigration, origin and diffusion of disease, and natural resource use. The Geographic approach is applied at different scales, from local to the global.

Geographers work with quantitative and qualitative data from a variety of sources and they use a variety of tools, including Global Positioning Systems (GPS), Geographic Information Systems (GIS), and other computer applications to collect, display, and analyze spatial data. Computer cartography and GIS software allow geographers to explore the world in much greater detail, and to study and address complex issues.

Geographic Information Systems (GIS) Certificate.

GIS is one of the top emerging industries in the 21st century. It combines cartography, spatial analysis, and data management to support research and inform decision making. PCC offers a less than one-year GIS Certificate that combines GIS concepts, technology, and real-world experience.

GIS is a framework to acquire, store, manage, analyze, and visualize spatial data. Traditional paper maps are able to display just one view of data, at one point in time. The use of GIS allows the display of information in various spaces and times. GIS provides a suite of tools used to support many kinds of decision-making, as well as statistical and spatial analysis.

The GIS Certificate prepares students to apply GIS with a solid theoretical foundation. A diverse range of geotechnical skills are covered including data capture, spatial and statistical analysis, GPS, Programming, modeling, and cartography.

Degrees and Certificates Offered

Less Than One-Year Certificate

Geographic Information Systems

Prerequisites and Requirements

  • WR 115 or equivalent placement scores
  • RD 115 or equivalent placement scores
  • MTH 60 or equivalent placement scores

Geographic Information Systems Less Than One-Year Certificate

Minimum 44 credits. Students must meet all certificate requirements.

Geographic Information Systems Certificate Credit Summary

GEO16
COMM4
Geography Electives8
GIS Electives12
Technical Electives4
Total Credits44

Course of Study

The coursework listed below is required. The following is an example of a term-by-term breakdown.  Electives can be distributed throughout the year in a variety of ways, not just the way it is listed below.  Students can start the GIS Certificate any term during the year although some GIS-specific classes have limited offerings.  It is highly recommended that you talk to the GIS Certificate Program adviser to plan your coursework. 

First TermCredits
GEO 264Maps & Geospatial Concepts4
GEO 265Introduction to GIS (Geographical Information Systems)4
GIS Elective4
Geography Elective4
Second Term
COMM 111Public Speaking4
GEO 266GIS Analysis4
GIS Elective4
Geography Elective4
Third Term
GEO 267Application Topics in Geographic Information Systems4
GIS Elective4
Technical Elective4
 Total Credits: 44

Geographic Information Systems Certificate GIS Electives

GEO 221Field Geography: The Local Landscape4
GEO 223Field Geography: GPS & GIS4
GEO 240Cartographic Principles and Applications4
GEO 242GIS Programming4
GEO 280ACE: Geography4
GEO 280BCE: Geography - Seminar1

Geographic Information Systems Certificate Geography Electives

GEO 105Introduction to Human Geography4
GEO 106World Regional Geography4
GEO 107Geography of Global Issues4
GEO 204Geography of Middle East4
GEO 206Geography of Oregon4
GEO 209Physical Geography: Weather and Climate4
GEO 210The Natural Environment4
GEO 230Geography of Race & Ethnic Conflicts4
GEO 250Geography of Africa3
GEO 298Independent Study: Geography3

Geographic Information Systems Certificate Technical Electives

CAS 106Introduction to HTML1
CAS 140Beginning Access3
CAS 170Beginning Excel3
CAS 171Intermediate Excel3
CAS 206Principles of HTML4
CAS 213JavaScript and JQuery for Designers4
CAS 215Cascading Style Sheets - CSS4
CIS 133WJavaScript for Web Developers4
CIS 125DDatabase Application Development I4
CIS 275Data Modeling and SQL Introduction4
MTH 243Statistics I5

Courses

GEO 105. Introduction to Human Geography. 4 Credits.

Introduces key geographic themes of location, place, region, human-environment interaction, and mobility. Includes an examination of spatial patterns of topics such as language, religion, culture, population, cooperation and conflict, natural resources, migration, and political organization. Addresses these topics at varying scales and with respect to their influence on the global landscape. Focuses on current issues and events. Prerequisite: WR 115, RD 115 and MTH 20 or equivalent placement test scores. Audit available. This course fulfills the following GE requirements: Cultural Literacy, Social Sciences/AAOT, Social Sciences/AS, Social Sciences/AAS, Social Sciences/AGS, Social Sciences/ASOT-B.

GEO 106. World Regional Geography. 4 Credits.

Examines the human, cultural, and environmental geographic issues that shape the world's regions. Includes information on spatial patterns of economic development, natural resource uses, international trade, population and migration, transportation, and cultural landscapes. Analyzes each region as part of the larger global community, with a specific emphasis on current issues and trends. Prerequisite: WR 115, RD 115, and MTH 20 or equivalent placement test scores. Audit available. This course fulfills the following GE requirements: Cultural Literacy, Social Sciences/AAOT, Social Sciences/AS, Social Sciences/AAS, Social Sciences/AGS, Social Sciences/ASOT-B.

GEO 107. Geography of Global Issues. 4 Credits.

Examines human, cultural, and environmental geography placed in context with current issues of social, economic, and political globalization. Includes information on global spatial patterns of agriculture; industrial, post-industrial, and sustainable development; rural-to-urban migration; religious, political and resource conflicts; and cultural landscapes. Uses regional examples to illustrate geographic concepts. Prerequisite: WR 115, RD 115, and MTH 20 or equivalent placement test scores. Audit available. This course fulfills the following GE requirements: Cultural Literacy, Social Sciences/AAOT, Social Sciences/AS, Social Sciences/AAS, Social Sciences/AGS, Social Sciences/ASOT-B.

GEO 204. Geography of Middle East. 4 Credits.

Examines the impacts of different physical and cultural factors on formation, development, and distribution patterns of human settlements. Examines the influence of religious beliefs as well as other cultural elements in the evolution of human landscapes and the quality of life within the region. Examines the Middle East as a culturally diverse region (i.e. not a monolith) and explores the dominant value systems held by different Middle Eastern societies. Focuses on population issues, urbanization processes, traditionalism, modernity, male-female relations, feminism, democracy, and westernization. Audit available. This course fulfills the following GE requirements: Cultural Literacy, Social Sciences/AAOT, Social Sciences/AS, Social Sciences/AAS, Social Sciences/AGS, Social Sciences/ASOT-B.

GEO 206. Geography of Oregon. 4 Credits.

Explores the various historical, social, economic, physical, and geographic factors that have contributed to the modern Oregon landscape. Delineates the major cultural and physical divisions within Oregon, in order to better understand the state's significant diversity. Emphasizes current issues and trends, and places the growth of Oregon into context with regional and national growth patterns. Prerequisite: WR 115, RD 115 and MTH 20 or equivalent placement test scores. Audit available. This course fulfills the following GE requirements: Cultural Literacy, Social Sciences/AAOT, Social Sciences/AS, Social Sciences/AAS, Social Sciences/AGS, Social Sciences/ASOT-B.

GEO 209. Physical Geography: Weather and Climate. 4 Credits.

Examines the processes of the atmosphere, the distribution and character of climate types, climate change and humankind as a modifier of climate. Prerequisite: WR 115, RD 115 and MTH 20 or equivalent placement test scores. Audit available. This course fulfills the following GE requirements: Social Sciences/AAOT, Social Sciences/AS, Social Sciences/AAS, Social Sciences/AGS, Social Sciences/ASOT-B.

GEO 210. The Natural Environment. 4 Credits.

Focuses on natural processes that create physical diversity on the earth. Includes weather and climate, vegetation, soils, landforms, ecosystems, their distribution and significance. Prerequisite: WR 115, RD 115 and MTH 20 or equivalent placement test scores. Audit available. This course fulfills the following GE requirements: Social Sciences/AAOT, Social Sciences/AS, Social Sciences/AAS, Social Sciences/AGS, Social Sciences/ASOT-B.

GEO 221. Field Geography: The Local Landscape. 4 Credits.

Uses field research methods in human geography and applications of GIS Works to prepare cartographic presentation of community needs and resources while working directly with a community organization. Prerequisite: WR 115, RD 115 and MTH 20 or equivalent placement test scores. Audit available. This course fulfills the following GE requirements: Social Sciences/AAOT, Social Sciences/AS, Social Sciences/AAS, Social Sciences/AGS, Social Sciences/ASOT-B.

GEO 223. Field Geography: GPS & GIS. 4 Credits.

Provides a conceptual overview and hands-on experience with Global Positioning Systems (GPS). Includes GPS theory, techniques, and field data methods. Uses hand-held GPS units, to collect and integrate spatial and non-spatial data within a Geographic Information Systems (GIS) framework. Covers differential correction, importing features and tabular data into GIS, data conversions, building a GIS database, and creating maps from GPS data. Prerequisite/Concurrent: GEO 265. Prerequisite: WR 115, RD 115 and MTH 20 or equivalent placement test scores. Audit available.

GEO 230. Geography of Race & Ethnic Conflicts. 4 Credits.

Examines the issues of race and ethnicity and their interrelationships with contemporary global patterns of political factionalism, economic disparity, religious fervor and ethnic nationalism. Examines how these issues influence the processes of development for various countries throughout the world. Audit available. This course fulfills the following GE requirements: Cultural Literacy, Social Sciences/AAOT, Social Sciences/AS, Social Sciences/AAS, Social Sciences/AGS, Social Sciences/ASOT-B.

GEO 240. Cartographic Principles and Applications. 4 Credits.

Explores basic cartographic design principles and how to apply them to produce high quality maps using GIS software. Introduces cartographic terminology, principles, and map-making tools. Covers visual representation and communication; how to turn geographic data into effective maps for print and the web; how to critique maps; map design and elements; and color, fonts, labels, and symbols for maps. Prerequisite: GEO 265, WR 115, RD 115, and MTH 20 or equivalent placement test scores. Audit available.

GEO 242. GIS Programming. 4 Credits.

Introduces the fundamentals of computer science in the context of Geographic Information Systems (GIS). Covers concepts used in automating mapping procedures, handling different types of data, and building custom functions using ESRI's ArcGIS software platform,. Provides opportunities to understand the dynamic inner workings of GIS using Python scripting language. Prerequisite: GEO 265, WR 115, RD 115, and MTH 20 or equivalent placement test scores. Audit available.

GEO 250. Geography of Africa. 3 Credits.

Provides an understanding of the geographical perspectives - physical and cultural landscapes, people, natural resources, economic activities, regions, and political divisions - of Africa south of the Sahara or Sub-Saharan Africa. Special emphasis on the region's historical geography and on its political, cultural and demographic ramifications to explain its problems and the changes now occurring in the region. Audit available.

GEO 264. Maps & Geospatial Concepts. 4 Credits.

Introduces principles and concepts needed to understand the use and interpretation of maps, geographic information systems & science. Includes: reference systems, coordinate systems, map projections, types of maps, geographic data, scale, data visualization, and map interpretation. Serves as the foundation for the GIS course sequence. Prerequisite: WR 115, RD 115 and MTH 20 or equivalent placement test scores. Audit available.

GEO 265. Introduction to GIS (Geographical Information Systems). 4 Credits.

Provides a conceptual overview and hands-on experience using ArcGIS software. Introduces basic principles of maps and map design and uses ArcGIS to create, edit, display, query and analyze geographic and tabular data and to create maps and charts. Prerequisite: WR 115, RD 115 and MTH 20 or equivalent placement test scores. Audit available. This course fulfills the following GE requirements: Social Sciences/AAOT, Social Sciences/AS, Social Sciences/AAS, Social Sciences/AGS, Social Sciences/ASOT-B.

GEO 266. GIS Analysis. 4 Credits.

Provides a more advanced overview of ArcGIS software and introduces extensions to the main ArcMap interface. Topics include preparing data for analysis, creating and managing databases, geocoding, creating and editing spatial data, and analyzing data using the Spatial Analyst and 3D Analyst extensions. Prerequisite: GEO 265; or instructor permission. Audit available.

GEO 267. Application Topics in Geographic Information Systems. 4 Credits.

Application focus varies and provides an opportunity for extended exposure to one or more of the analytical techniques first learned in prerequisite courses. Attention to institutional and professional GIS application issues and programming environments. Prerequisite: GEO 266; or instructor permission. Audit available.

GEO 280A. CE: Geography. 1-4 Credit.

Enables students to extend their knowledge of Geography through work in settings which provide learning experiences that are not available in the classroom, but which supplement classroom learning. Under the employer's supervision the student learns to apply classroom theory to actual work situations. Department permission required. Audit available.

GEO 280B. CE: Geography - Seminar. 1 Credit.

Provides a forum in which to discuss work experiences with peers and instructor. Department permission required. Audit available.

GEO 298. Independent Study: Geography. 3 Credits.

Offers individualized study at an advanced level in areas of geography not considered in other courses to meet special interests or program requirements. Students complete a term project and readings approved by the instructor. Recommended: prior study of geography. Audit available.