Psychology

pcc.edu/programs/psychology/

Description

Psychology is the scientific study of behavior and mental processes. Psychologists use diverse technological, psycho-physiological, statistical and analytical techniques to investigate how the individual’s immediate environment, past experience, physiological makeup, and sociocultural context influence current thoughts, emotions and behavior.  Psychologists actively translate basic science into usable technology, educational innovations, and practical interventions at the personal, group, community, and societal levels.   

People with a bachelor’s degree in psychology may pursue careers in a variety of fields, in both the public and private sectors. Careers within the field of psychology often require graduate degrees - and depending on the career -specialized certification/licensure.  Psychology students at PCC typically pursue a transfer or bachelor’s degree or another related certificate. Psychology degrees at the associate's level are not available.

PSY 101. Psychology and Human Relations. 4 Credits.

Applies evidence-based psychological principles to personal and professional relationships in social and cultural contexts. Includes an overview of basic psychological and cultural concepts related to human behavior and interactions. Introduces principles of communication, listening, and conflict resolution with an emphasis on skill development to improve relationships. Prerequisite: (WR 115 and RD 115) or IRW 115 and MTH 20 or equivalent placement. Audit available.
This course fulfills the following GE requirements: Social Sciences/SS

PSY 201A. Introduction to Psychology I (PSY201A=PSY201AZ). 4 Credits.

Introduces the science and application of psychology. Emphasizes psychological concepts, theories, and principles related to: Research Methods, Behavioral Neuroscience, Consciousness, Sensation/Perception, Learning, Memory, Thinking and Intelligence, and related topics. This course is part of Oregon Common Course Numbering. PSY 201A and PSY 201AZ are equivalent. Prerequisites: (WR 115 and RD 115) or IRW 115 and MTH 20 or equivalent placement. Audit available.
This course fulfills the following GE requirements: Cultural Literacy, Cultural Literacy/DIV, Social Sciences/SS

PSY 202A. Introduction to Psychology II (PSY202A=PSY202AZ). 4 Credits.

Introduces the science and application of psychology. Emphasizes psychological concepts, theories, and principles related to: Personality, Social Psychology, Health and Well-Being, Motivation and Emotion, Disorders, Therapies, Lifespan Development, and related topics. This course is part of Oregon Common Course Numbering. PSY 202A and PSY 202AZ are equivalent. Prerequisites: (WR 115 and RD 115) or IRW 115 and MTH 20 or equivalent placement. Audit available.
This course fulfills the following GE requirements: Cultural Literacy, Cultural Literacy/DIV, Social Sciences/SS

PSY 213. Introduction to Behavioral Neuroscience. 4 Credits.

Introduces the major concepts in behavioral neuroscience. Surveys the role of the brain and nervous system in behavior and psychological functioning with particular focus on the basics of nervous system signaling, the sensory and motor systems as well as the neural bases of substance abuse, psychopathology, learning, memory, emotion, sleep, and language. Prerequisite: (WR 115 and RD 115) or IRW 115 and MTH 20 or equivalent placement, and PSY 201A or (BI 112 or BI 120 or BI 121 or BI 231 or BI 232). Audit available.

PSY 214. Introduction to Personality. 4 Credits.

Covers a variety of personality theories including the theoretical and scientific explanations for individuals' characteristic patterns of perception, thought, emotion and behavior. Emphasizes the understanding and mastery of personality constructs applied to students' personal and professional lives. Recommended: PSY 201A or PSY 202A. Prerequisites: (WR 115 and RD 115) or IRW 115 and MTH 20 or equivalent placement. Audit available.

PSY 215. Human Development. 4 Credits.

Introduces major developmental theories and ways humans change and stay the same across the lifespan, from conception to death. Emphasizes cultural and other environmental influences on biological, cognitive, social, and emotional development throughout the lifespan. Although this course maintains a focus on psychology, human development draws information from other academic fields. Recommended: PSY 201A or 202A. Prerequisites: (WR 115 and RD 115) or IRW 115 and MTH 20 or equivalent placement. Audit available.
This course fulfills the following GE requirements: Social Sciences/SS

PSY 216. Social Psychology. 4 Credits.

Surveys the scientific study of how individuals think about, influence, and relate to one another with respect to social beliefs, persuasion, attraction, conformity, obedience, prejudice, aggression, and pro-social behaviors. Prerequisites: (WR 115 and RD 115) or IRW 115 and MTH 20 or equivalent placement. Audit available.

PSY 222. Family & Intimate Relationships. 4 Credits.

Explores processes involved in both traditional and non-traditional relationships and families: including love, cohabitation, dating, marriage, parenting, communication and conflict resolution, sexuality, balancing work and family, domestic violence, divorce, remarriage, and blended families. Prerequisites: (WR 115 and RD 115) or IRW 115 and MTH 20 or equivalent placement. Audit available.

PSY 231. Foundations of Human Sexuality. 4 Credits.

Examines sexuality from scientific and humanistic perspectives. Surveys sex research, female, intersex, male, and transgender sexual and reproductive anatomy and physiology. Also examines sexual response, evidence-based healthy communication within relationships, sexual behavior patterns, love, and sexual orientations. Analyzes the historical and cultural variations in gender and sexuality. Discusses how gender and sexuality intersect with additional identities and how these intersections impact sexual thoughts and behaviors. Prerequisites: (WR 115 and RD 115) or IRW 115 and MTH 20 or equivalent placement. Audit available.

PSY 232. Human Sexuality in Social Context. 4 Credits.

Examines sexual issues from scientific and humanistic perspectives. Surveys sexuality through the lifespan, sexual problems, sexual satisfaction, contraception, pregnancy and birth, sexuality and disability, sex and chronic illness, sexually transmitted infections, the commercialization of sex, sexual victimization, non consensual sexual behavior, and therapeutic techniques. Recommended: PSY 231 taken concurrently or before PSY 232. Prerequisites: (WR 115 and RD 115) or IRW 115 and MTH 20 or equivalent placement. Audit available.

PSY 236. Psychology of Adult Development and Aging. 4 Credits.

Provides an overview of the biological, cognitive, and psychosocial aspects of adulthood and aging including theories of aging and specific research in the field of gerontology. Focuses on genetic and environmental factors that influence health as we age. Includes the challenges specific to gender, ability level, and culture. Recommended: PSY 201 or PSY 201A or PSY 215. Prerequisites: (WR 115 and RD 115) or IRW 115 and MTH 20 or equivalent placement. Audit available.

PSY 239. Introduction to Abnormal Psychology. 4 Credits.

Surveys the history, theories, etiology, assessment, diagnosis, and treatment of the spectrum of psychological disorders. Prerequisites: (PSY 201 or PSY 201A or PSY 202A) or (AD 102 with instructor permission), and (WR 115 and RD 115) or IRW 115 and MTH 20 or equivalent placement. Audit available.

PSY 240. Personal Awareness and Growth. 4 Credits.

Explores multidimensional perspectives on personal growth and awareness, and how to apply this knowledge to healthy cognitive and behavioral practices in daily living. Covers dimensions of growth including physical, intrapersonal, interpersonal, cognitive, occupational/educational, communal/environmental, and spiritual. Introduces various aspects of personal growth including how childhood and adolescent development and experiences affect thinking, feelings, and behavior; differentiation; self-discipline and resilience; authentic happiness; love and relationships; stress management; creative expression; body image and awareness; education and job/career pursuits; loneliness and solitude; death; and loss. Prerequisites: (WR 115 and RD 115) or IRW 115 and MTH 20 or equivalent placement. Audit available.