Native American Studies

pcc.edu/programs/native-american/

Description

Native American Studies (NAS) is an interdisciplinary study of the Indigenous peoples of the United States. By applying a hemispheric perspective to studying the Indigenous peoples of this country, NAS examines Native American experiences and worldviews in relation to the larger context of Indigenous experiences throughout the Americas and the Pacific.

NAS studies the Native Nations of the United States from antiquity to the present and future. NAS emphasizes the centrality of Indigenous languages to Indigenous worldviews and ways of knowing, and it analyzes effects of invasion and colonization on Native American populations. NAS examines U.S. Federal Indian law and policy, Native citizenship and enrollment, methods of tribal governance, and Native arts and cultural expressions.

NAS at PCC prioritizes Indigenous communities and experiences by emphasizing Native survival, resilience, adaptation, political self-determination, tribal sovereignty, and Indigenous futures. NAS contributes to many fields, and it is valuable for anyone planning to work with diverse communities and cultures.

NAS courses at PCC are designed to transfer as credit toward the new major in Indigenous Nations and Native American Studies at Portland State University. These courses may also transfer as credit toward a major in Native American Studies, Ethnic Studies, or American Studies at other regional universities, and they will transfer to most other university degree programs as elective credit. Students planning to transfer to a college or university other than Portland State University should see an adviser for additional information and guidance.

 

NAS 201. Introduction to Native American Studies. 4 Credits.

Provides interdisciplinary, historical, and contemporary perspectives on the social, political, legal, economic, environmental, and cultural issues of Indigenous Peoples of the United States. Examines the Native Nations of the United States from antiquity to the present and future. Explores Indigenous languages and worldviews. Analyzes effects of invasion and colonization with an emphasis on survival, political self-determination, and tribal sovereignty. Examines U.S. Federal Indian law and policy, Native citizenship and enrollment, methods of tribal governance, and Native American arts and cultural expressions. Prerequisite: (WR 115 and RD 115) or IRW 115 and MTH 20 or equivalent placement. Audit available.
This course fulfills the following GE requirements: Arts and Letters/AL

NAS 202. Teaching and Learning Native American Languages. 4 Credits.

Examines Indigenous languages of North America. Examines similarities and differences of various Native American languages. Requires participants to select one Indigenous, Native American, First Nations, or Alaska Native language and to develop awareness of and competency with that language. Prerequisite: NAS 201 or instructor permission, and (WR 115 and RD 115) or IRW 115 and MTH 20 or equivalent placement. Audit available.

NAS 203. Indigenous Art of the United States and Canada. 4 Credits.

Provides an overview of Native American artwork with an emphasis on artwork from the United States and tribes that spanned the US-Canada border. Examines artwork from all eras of Indigenous culture. Compares contemporary Native American artwork with artwork from earlier eras. Studies Native American artistic traditions, and discusses issues and themes particular to Indigenous artwork. Explores the cultural, political, social, and historic contexts for the artwork, providing students with a multidisciplinary understanding of Indigenous artwork. Prioritizes Indigenous voices as a direct source of knowledge and insight. This course is also offered as ART 203; a student who enrolls in this course a second time under either designator will be subject to the course repeat policy. Prerequisites: (WR 115 and RD 115) or IRW 115 and MTH 20 or equivalent placement. Audit available.
This course fulfills the following GE requirements: Arts and Letters/AL

NAS 240. Introduction to Native American Literatures. 4 Credits.

Studies literary arts and cultural expressions by Native American authors. Considers Native American literatures in their national, historical, cultural, geographical, political, and legal contexts. Prioritizes Indigenous experience, worldview, and intellectual traditions in the study of Native literatures. ENG 240 and NAS 240 are equivalent and only one can be taken for credit. Prerequisites: (WR 115 and RD 115) or IRW 115 or equivalent placement. Audit available.
This course fulfills the following GE requirements: Cultural Literacy, Arts and Letters/AL, Cultural Literacy/DIV

NAS 249. Introduction to Alaska Native Studies. 4 Credits.

Provides interdisciplinary, historical, and contemporary perspectives on the social, political, legal, economic, environmental, and cultural issues of Indigenous Peoples of what is now the state of "Alaska." Examines Alaska Native Nations from antiquity to the present and future. Explores Alaska Native languages and worldviews. Analyzes effects of invasion and colonization with an emphasis on survival, political self-determination, and tribal sovereignty. Examines U.S. Federal Indian Law and policy, Alaska Native citizenship and enrollment, methods of tribal governance, and Alaska Native arts and cultural expressions. Prerequisites: (WR 115 and RD 115) or IRW 115 and MTH 20 or equivalent placement. Audit available.
This course fulfills the following GE requirements: Arts and Letters/AL